CRC806-Database Data Feed (RSS) http://crc806db.uni-koeln.de/ Data feed of the CRC806-Database Rock surface IRSL dating of buried cobbles from an alpine dry-stone structure in Val di Sole, Italy https://crc806db.uni-koeln.de/dataset/show/rock-surface-irsl-dating-of-buried-cobbles-from-an-alpine-drystone-structure-in-val-di-s1626873738/ Here, we investigate the application of rock surface IRSL dating to chronology restrain archaeological structures related to upland pastoralism. We applied the method to cobbles collected from archaeological units in an excavation of a dry-stone structure in Val di Sole in the Italian Alps. At this site, archaeological finds and previous radiocarbon analyses have dated an initial human occupation of the site to the Early Bronze Age (ca. 2200–1600 BC), and a possible second occupation to the Middle Bronze Age (ca. 1600–1350 BC). These archaeological units have later been buried by colluvial sediments. Theoretically, the luminescence-depth profiles from rock surfaces from inside such structures could record the exposure and burial of these archaeological units. We collected buried gneiss cobbles from these archaeological units and measured rock slices and chips from 1 to 4 cm long cores with a low-temperature pIR-IRSL protocol to investigate the signal resetting in these cobbles. Only the IRSL50 signal was deemed appropriate for dating. Measured luminescence-depth profiles demonstrate varying levels of signal resetting before burial. Dating of two paragneiss cobbles from the lower unit yielded corrected burial ages of 1450-700 BC and 19 ka. The older date is clearly not associated with human occupation; the younger date slightly underestimates the Early Bronze Age occupation, which was confirmed by new radiocarbon dating of charcoal (1731-1452 and 2124-1773 cal. BC). The burial of the upper archaeological unit was dated to AD 1000, based on ages derived from the bottom surface of an orthogneiss cobble and the top surface of a paragneiss cobble. This is slightly younger than two new radiocarbon ages (426-596 and 537-654 cal. AD) from charcoal fragments sampled from the same unit. This new chronological data show longer exposure of the upper archaeological unit than was previously known. Furthermore, the paragneiss cobble from the upper unit has been exposed to sufficient heat to reset the IRSL50 and pIR-IRSL290 signals throughout the cobble; an event which can be dated to AD 100–1500 BC. Comparisons between fading-corrected IRSL50 ages and pIR-IRSL290 ages from the heated cobble are in agreement, which suggests that the conventional g-value approach accurately corrects for signal loss during burial. Overall, our research suggests that rock surface IRSL dating can provide complementary chronological data for archaeological settings. 2021-07-21T13:22:17+02:00 lageby@uni-koeln.de Rock surface IRSL dating of buried cobbles from an alpine dry-stone structure in Val di Sole, Italy https://crc806db.uni-koeln.de/dataset/show/rock-surface-irsl-dating-of-buried-cobbles-from-an-alpine-drystone-structure-in-val-di-s1626873680/ Here, we investigate the application of rock surface IRSL dating to chronology restrain archaeological structures related to upland pastoralism. We applied the method to cobbles collected from archaeological units in an excavation of a dry-stone structure in Val di Sole in the Italian Alps. At this site, archaeological finds and previous radiocarbon analyses have dated an initial human occupation of the site to the Early Bronze Age (ca. 2200–1600 BC), and a possible second occupation to the Middle Bronze Age (ca. 1600–1350 BC). These archaeological units have later been buried by colluvial sediments. Theoretically, the luminescence-depth profiles from rock surfaces from inside such structures could record the exposure and burial of these archaeological units. We collected buried gneiss cobbles from these archaeological units and measured rock slices and chips from 1 to 4 cm long cores with a low-temperature pIR-IRSL protocol to investigate the signal resetting in these cobbles. Only the IRSL50 signal was deemed appropriate for dating. Measured luminescence-depth profiles demonstrate varying levels of signal resetting before burial. Dating of two paragneiss cobbles from the lower unit yielded corrected burial ages of 1450-700 BC and 19 ka. The older date is clearly not associated with human occupation; the younger date slightly underestimates the Early Bronze Age occupation, which was confirmed by new radiocarbon dating of charcoal (1731-1452 and 2124-1773 cal. BC). The burial of the upper archaeological unit was dated to AD 1000, based on ages derived from the bottom surface of an orthogneiss cobble and the top surface of a paragneiss cobble. This is slightly younger than two new radiocarbon ages (426-596 and 537-654 cal. AD) from charcoal fragments sampled from the same unit. This new chronological data show longer exposure of the upper archaeological unit than was previously known. Furthermore, the paragneiss cobble from the upper unit has been exposed to sufficient heat to reset the IRSL50 and pIR-IRSL290 signals throughout the cobble; an event which can be dated to AD 100–1500 BC. Comparisons between fading-corrected IRSL50 ages and pIR-IRSL290 ages from the heated cobble are in agreement, which suggests that the conventional g-value approach accurately corrects for signal loss during burial. Overall, our research suggests that rock surface IRSL dating can provide complementary chronological data for archaeological settings. 2021-07-21T13:21:19+02:00 lageby@uni-koeln.de Geoarchaeology and Geochronology of the Upper Palaeolithic site of Temerești Dealu Vinii, Banat, Romania: Site formation processes and human activity of an open-air locality https://crc806db.uni-koeln.de/dataset/show/geoarchaeology-and-geochronology-of-the-upper-palaeolithic-site-of-temereti-dealu-vinii-1626425466/ Abstract This paper reports on the excavation of a Late Pleistocene site at Temerești Dealu Vinii in Western Romania, one of only four sizeable lithic assemblages with similarities to the tradition known from open-air localities in this region. The site consists of a flint scatter covering an area of at least 15 square meters and is comprised of blade, bladelet and flake cores, knapping debris and retouched tools including endscrapers and burins. An interesting feature of Temerești Dealu Vinii is that it is on the same river system as the Upper Palaeolithic sites of Românești and Coșava that are about 10 km upstream. Similarities in the tools and blade technology imply that the sites may have been roughly contemporary. Here, we report on new artifacts, geochemistry, grain size, GIS analysis and geochronology that point to a Holocene reworking of the site. It also highlights the importance of rivers to humans as communication routes in the Upper Palaeolithic in the region. Zusammenfassung Dieser Artikel berichtet von der Ausgrabung der jungpleistozänen Fundstelle Temerești Dealu Vinii im Westen Rumäniens. Die Fundstelle ist eine von insgesamt nur vier umfangreichen Sammlungen prähistorischer Steinwerkzeuge aus Freilandfundstellen in der Region, die sich ähnliche Traditionen hinsichtlich der Steingeräteherstellung teilen. Die Lokalität Temerești weist eine Fundstreuung von Silices auf, die über einen Bereich von mindestens 15 Quadratmetern reicht. Die Sammlung beinhaltet Klingen, Lamellen, Kerne, Schlagabfälle und retuschierte Werkzeuge wie Kratzer und Stichel. Bemerkenswert ist die Lage von Temerești an demselben Flusssystem wie die 10 km flussaufwärts liegenden jungpaläolithischen Fundstellen Românești und Coșava. Gemeinsamkeiten in der Werkzeug- und Klingentechnologie zeigen, dass die Fundstellen zeitgleich besiedelt waren. Unsere Analyse der Artefakte, Geochemie, Korngrößen, sowie GIS-gestützte Auswertung der Geomorphologie und die Geochronologie legen nahe, dass die Sedimente der Fundstelle holozän überprägt wurden. Außerdem wird gezeigt, dass Flüsse wichtige Kommunikationswege während des Jungpaläolithikums in der Region darstellten. 2021-07-16T08:51:05+02:00 janina.boesken@geo.rwth-aachen.de Initial quartz OSL and dust mass accumulation rate investigation of the Kisiljevo loess sequence in north-eastern Serbia https://crc806db.uni-koeln.de/dataset/show/initial-quartz-osl-and-dust-mass-accumulation-rate-investigation-of-the-kisiljevo-loess-1626425140/ The thick and apparently continuous loess-palaeosol sequences in the Vojvodina region of northern Serbia are recognized and well understood as some of the oldest and most complete terrestrial European palaeoclimatic archives. By contrast, there are few published records for loess profiles from other regions in Serbia. Here we address this knowledge gap by investigating an 8 m thick loess sequence exposed near the village of Kisiljevo in north-eastern Serbia, describing the pedostratigraphy and environmental magnetic signatures in detail and placing these within a chronologic framework using quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) on the 4–11 and 63–90 μm size fractions. Our results show dust accumulation over the last c. 32 ka, with substantial primary loess accumulation during the Early Holocene prior to the formation of the modern soil. We applied two age-depth modelling approaches to estimate dust mass accumulation rates: the Bacon.r software and ADmin model. Both yield high accumulation rates, especially during MIS 2, averaging 550–600 g m−2 a−1 which exceed estimates for other investigated loess sequences in the region. 2021-07-16T08:45:38+02:00 janina.boesken@geo.rwth-aachen.de Geomorphological evolution of the Petrovaradin Fortress Palaeolithic site (Novi Sad, Serbia) https://crc806db.uni-koeln.de/dataset/show/geomorphological-evolution-of-the-petrovaradin-fortress-palaeolithic-site-novi-sad-serbi1626424946/ Two phases of archaeological investigation were performed in the Novi Sad City Museum at Petrovaradin Fortress. In this study, we summarize the results of geo-archaeological investigations of the second period of excavation inside the Novi Sad City Museum building. The fortress is situated on a Danube terrace with the top of the bedrock at ca.123m asl. The investigated section consists of undisturbed fine-sandy silt. The grain-size distribution of the sediments indicates clearly its alluvial reworking but shows also a general similarity with typical primary loess in the region. All analyzed proxies indicate slightly stronger weathering in the upper part of the profile. Luminescence ages suggest that the investigated sequence covers the last glacial period and the terrace presumably formed during MIS 4. Subsequently, the Danube started its incision at the start of the nextwarmer period (MIS 3) onward. This terrace age and elevation enable us to derive an uplift rate of the terrace of ca. 0.73 mm/a for the last 60 ka, which seems to increase towards the present. Basal loessicmaterial, in which artifacts occur, likely in the reworked position, indicate that the area close to today’s Petrovaradin Fortress was already inhabited in MIS 5. 2021-07-16T08:42:25+02:00 janina.boesken@geo.rwth-aachen.de